After 30 years of civil war, Angola and its people live with daily reminders of that terrible conflict. 10 million mines and vast amounts of unexploded ordnance litter the ground, making every step a potentially life-threatening decision.

Minga D'Olinda, eight-years-old, is from a rural town in Angola. She plays games with the cans she finds on the road. Her grandmother teaches her Portuguese using the ground outside their home as a chalkboard. Minga teases her when she gets something wrong.

Minga's grandmother, Dominga, loves to be with her granddaughter. She is a farmer who depends on the work she does in the fields to take care of her family.

Eron Pedro, 42, was a soldier in the Civil War, and his role during and since that conflict has had a dramatic effect on the lives of Angolans like Minga and her grandmother.

Each of these characters is wrapped intimately into the story of Mines Advisory Group, or MAG, an organization that removes landmines and unexploded ordnance from war-torn countries all over the world. Their involvement is crucial for the continued development of Angola and its people.